Stacks of a nuclear power plant. (Credit: Markus Distelrath/Pixabay) Anthropology Book Reviews Citizen Science Health SciStarter Blog 

Nuclear Radiation, Citizen Science, and Civic Engagement

In Japan after a nuclear radiation disaster Book Review: Radiation Brain Moms and Citizen Scientists: The Gender Politics of Food Contamination after Fukushima. By Aya Hirata Kimura. Durham: Duke University Press, 2016.  Nuclear Radiation and Food Safety In March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake off the coast of Japan triggered a tsunami that would result in a tragic loss of life. Water overtook the seawalls at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and damaged critical systems. These events resulted in one of the worst nuclear disasters in history. Survivors near…

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Book Reviews SciStarter Blog 

Seeking the Sasquatch

Book Review: When the Sasquatch Legend Teaches Us About Critical Thinking By Patricia Balbon (@watscicomm) Gordon, David George. The Sasquatch Seeker’s Field Manual: Using Citizen Science to Uncover North America’s Most Elusive Creature. Mountaineers Books, 2015. 176 pages. Paperback US$12.26. It’s late, and you’re seeking shelter for the night after a long hike. Something’s lurking among the shadows; pungent wafts of musk barrage your nostrils. In the soft mud, you glimpse a fresh footprint with claw contours.  The fronds of a nearby fern are in shreds—could it be a bear?…

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Book Reviews SciStarter Blog 

Reflecting on the Life of a Citizen Scientist

by Danielle Griffin Smitten by Giraffe: My Life as a Citizen Scientist is a memoir by Anne Innis Dagg. In the text, she describes her pursuits as a citizen scientist, ranging from her first encounter with giraffe (the plural of giraffe used in Smitten By Giraffe is “giraffe”) as a child, through her studies at the University of Toronto in the 1950s, to her more recent projects. Dagg calls herself a citizen scientist, but like many other citizen scientists, she has in fact worn many hats in her long and…

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Book Reviews SciStarter Blog 

Changing Methods of Science Communication Online

by Dr. Ashley Rose Mehlenbacher Science Communication Online: A New Book Exploring How We Do and Share Science On the Internet. Free access! An open access copy under a Creative Commons CC BY-NC-ND license is also available from The Ohio State University Press, and you can download a copy here: https://kb.osu.edu/handle/1811/87159 —or, you may purchase the book from the press or most major book retailers. When we discuss science communication, we often talk about it as either targeted at professional scientists or as targeted at the public. However, with the…

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Book Reviews Ecology Oceanography SciStarter Blog 

Book Review: a World Without Fish and Unraveling Ocean Life

by Patricia Balbon Day-to-day encounters of fish—at the grocery store, visiting an aquarium—passively reinforce a notion of triviality about aquatic life until we are prompted to take a pause and spare a thought for a breathtaking world beyond the shore. This month’s selection in our ongoing book review series, World Without Fish, prompts such reflection; however, as the pages turn, we witness the marine world’s vulnerability alongside its majesty.  Through Mark Kurlansky’s words and Frank Stockton’s art, we are challenged by the crisis of disappearing biodiversity in our oceans.  This…

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Blogs Book Reviews Citizen Science SciStarter Blog 

Book Review: Building a Foundation in Environmental Science

Dickinson, Janis L. & Bonney, Rick. (eds). Citizen Science: Public Participation in Environmental Research. Cornell University Press, 2012. 279 pages. Paperback $US 29.95. Though it was published in 2012, Citizen Science: Public Participation in Environmental Research is relevant to our present moment. As discussions of environmental research increase in frequency and urgency, institutions at all levels will continue to raise questions about the public’s scientific literacy and the best methods of mobilizing scientific knowledge. This text works through these questions, asserting that “citizen science has a crucial role to play”…

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Astronomy What We're Reading 

Adventure Through the Universe from Your Telescope

Title: See It With a Small Telescope: 101 Cosmic Wonders, Including Planets, Moons, Comets, Galaxies, Nebulae, Star Clusters, and More  Shared by: Will Kalif for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication. Text adapted from See It With a Small Telescope. Author: Will Kalif  Publisher: Ulysses Press On sale: November 2017 Best for: Astronomy buffs, telescope owners, and readers interested in popular science and space.  The night sky is a deep, rich field of stars. Under normal dark sky conditions, when there is a new moon, there are approximately six thousand objects…

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Astronomy What We're Reading 

What We’re Reading: The Planet Factory

Title: The Planet Factory Shared by: Amanda Alvarez for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Author: Elizabeth Tasker Publisher: Bloomsbury Sigma On sale: Sept. 7, 2017 in UK; Nov. 7, 2017 in USA Best for: Enthusiastic 17-plus-year-olds, readers interested in popular science and space URL: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/the-planet-factory-9781472917720/ Exo is the new black The Planet Factory is a guide to real-life Tatooines, planets made of diamonds, and possible Earth twins. Since the 1995 discovery of the first planet outside the solar system, exoplanetology has become one of the most in-vogue scientific fields, and…

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Astronomy What We're Reading 

What We’re Reading: Asteroid Hunters

Asteroid Hunters by Carrie Nugent Shared by Steven Spence for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Published by Simon and Schuster / TED Books On sale March 2017 Best for ages 12 and up   On any given day, about 90,000 kilograms of dust and small rocks hit the Earth. What happens when something larger is on a collision course with Earth? You may remember February 15, 2013 as the day when a small, rocky asteroid 20 meters in diameter exploded due to air pressure and heat at an altitude of 38 km. The event was…

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GotScience Book Review Book Reviews 

Book Review: Bring Back the King

Title: Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction Reviewed by: Steven Spence for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Author: Helen Pilcher Publisher: Bloomsbury (Sigma Series) On sale: September 2016 Best for: High school and up Reviewer’s rating: 5 out of 5 Introduction Playing on both T. rex and Elvis Presley in the title and text, Helen Pilcher covers some serious, cutting-edge science in her breezily written book Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction. Readers will be introduced to DNA, cloning, the use of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly…

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