Proof of evolution is in your DNA Anthropology Biology Education Genetics Videos 

Proof of Evolution Is in Your DNA

Another great video from our friend Dr. Joe Hanson and the team at It’s Okay to Be Smart, brought to you by PBS Digital Studios. This time, we’re looking at the proof of evolution that’s embedded right there in our DNA. Humans are special, and we got that way thanks to evolution and natural selection. The proof is right there in our bodies! From anatomy to genes, here are some stories of how you got to be the way you are. Dr. Joe Hanson, It’s Okay to Be Smart References…

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7 Scientific Urban Legends Debunked Education Videos 

7 Scientific Urban Legends Debunked

How reliable is common knowledge? If a large number of people believe something, that doesn’t make it true. Dr. Joe Hanson of the It’s OK to Be Smart series from PBS Digital Studios debunks 7 scientific urban legends. He also makes a compelling argument for why we desperately need open-access science information and effective communication. Sometimes common knowledge is wrong. For common knowledge to be right, then knowledge needs to be, well, common. It sounds like such an incredible fact. “Our own cells are outnumbered by our microbes 10 to…

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Education Engineering Physics 

The Simple Machines in Your Life

Simple machines allow us to do more work with less effort. In this episode, Sophie explains what simple machines are and how we use them to make our lives easier every day. Get to know your friendly neighborhood inclined plane, lever, wedge, and a head of lettuce and join Sophie in a fun science experiment. Fun with simple machines With a few items from around the house, you can join Sophie in a fun science experiment. Here at Science Connected, we love inexpensive kitchen science experiments! To do Sophie’s experiment…

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Biology Botany Education 

Curing “Plant Blindness” with Botanical Gardens and Farms

By Neha Jain (@lifesciexplore) What was the last plant you saw? Have you ever seen a grain of wheat? How many varieties of rice are there? Although many of us desire a green environment, more and more people, especially urban dwellers, are becoming oblivious to the plants around them—so much so that just over two decades ago, researchers even coined a term for this phenomenon: “plant blindness.”  Much of the food we eat today is the result of thousands of years of plant cultivation and breeding by our ancestors. As…

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Education 

Reintroducing Science Connected Magazine

GotScience has always been part of the nonprofit organization Science Connected, and it’s time to fully bring the two projects together. Beginning July 1, GotScience Magazine will become Science Connected Magazine! Our mission at Science Connected has always been to produce honest, engaging, and available science communication and literature about science for educators and lifelong learners, written by scientists and science communicators. We do this by creating a collaborative space for researchers, citizen scientists, educators, and science communicators to write about scientific projects that will change our world. And because…

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Citizen Science Connected Blog Education 

Cyberchase Makes Math and Science Exciting, Fun, and Relevant to Kids

By Bob Krech Based on my many years of teaching elementary math and science, I know that when kids are bored with math and science, it’s usually because they don’t see the point of how these subjects could be useful or interesting in the context of their real lives. Kids want to apply their math and science skills to make things happen! One great way to help them do this and see the value of these subjects is to introduce the idea of citizen science. Citizen science creates connections for…

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Education Science & Art Uncategorized 

Interactive, Educational Theater with Jargie the Science Girl

By Shayna Keyles (@shaynakeyles) Since Jocelyn Argueta was young, science has been fun for her. It’s a creative endeavor that allows her to push forward and create new things. Most of all, it’s inspiring. That’s one of the inspirations behind Jargie the Science Girl!, an interactive science performance produced by Phantom Projects Theater Group. The nonprofit troupe, based in the La Mirada Theater for Performing Arts, has been producing educational, hard-hitting theater for teens and youth since 1997. Their shows cover themes including bullying, racism, prejudice, and tolerance, and are…

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Biology Education Opinion 

A Day in the Life of a Vascular Biologist

By Noeline Subramaniam (@spicy_scientist) A vascular biologist studies blood vessels. Blood vessels connect all of our organs and tissues in our body to each other; as such, they play a crucial role in helping to maintain homeostasis—in other words, keeping the balance within our body. They have several important functions including transporting nutrients and removing waste, sensing blood flow, playing a role in the immune system, and much more. The two major types of blood vessels are arteries and veins. Arteries travel away from the heart and veins return to the…

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Citizen Science Promotes Environmental Engagement Citizen Science Education 

Citizen Science: An Important Tool for Researchers

By Shayna Keyles (@shaynakeyles). If you have been following GotScience.org for a while, you have probably seen the term citizen science, but you may still be unfamiliar with what that means. Consider this article a bit of Citizen Science 101. Citizen science describes a collaborative scientific process in which non-scientists, or citizen scientists, collaborate with scientists, who are trained professionals, often with a postgraduate degree, employed in a scientific field. Citizen scientists may have received science education or have participated in research, but they are not employed as scientists. Citizen…

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Science with Sophie: Scabs, scab Biology Education Health Videos 

Science with Sophie: Scab Science

Scab Science It’s happened to all of us. You’re running or riding your bike, you slip, you fall, and you skin your knee. After a few days, you notice that the cut where you skinned your knee has formed a scab. What happens to our bodies when we get hurt? Why do we get cuts, and why do we get scabs afterward? Learn how white blood cells, proteins, and skin cells work together to help you get better after you get hurt in this episode of Science with Sophie! Do…

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