Vaishnavi Sridhar

Vaishnavi Sridhar

Vaishnavi Sridar is a PhD candidate in Cell and Developmental Biology in the Conibear lab at the University of British Columbia, Canada. She studies proteins required for different parts of a cell (organelles) to contact each other and the relevance of these inter-organellar contacts for cellular function and disease. When not in the lab, she can be found taking a walk on the UBC campus, watching Netflix, volunteering, doing origami or cooking something delicious.

Yeast grown to spell "Yeast" with a smiley face beneath. Credit: Vaishnavi Sridhar

Yeast, A Poem

Scientist, artist: Science inspires art in this poem about the properties of yeast and its similarities to human cells. By Vaishnavi Sridhar Our bodies are made up of cells. Cells are made of different parts called organelles that communicate with ...
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An overweight woman in a pink t-shirt flexing her muscles while using resistance training gym equipment. Exercise such as resistance training helps diet-resistant women improve their fitness.

Diet-Resistant Women Respond Well to Exercise

Exercise may stimulate changes to the body at a cellular level, leading to new treatment possibilities for diet-resistant women with obesity. By Vaishnavi Sridhar Right from childhood, eating healthy and being active is often emphasized. Similar messages may be repeated ...
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Researchers find that drumming in woodpeckers is neurologically similar to singing in songbirds. Credit: Attribution withheld at license-holder's request (CC-BY 4.0, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Is Drumming Like Singing? A Focus on Woodpeckers

Woodpeckers may not sing out melodies, but a new study hones in on how their drumming may be similar to birdsong on a neural level. By Vaishnavi Sridhar Have you experienced the wonderful sounds made by various birds? For example, ...
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In their study of moth migration, the researchers focused on the death’s-head hawkmoth—a large, nocturnal migrant that travels up to 4,000 kilometers between Europe and Africa every year. Image credit: Christian Ziegler / Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior

Moths Know Where to Go: A Look at Moth Migration

Moth migration may be guided by an internal compass to find the way, according to a new study that tracked flight paths of individual moths. By Vaishnavi Sridhar Just like we may take an annual vacation, every year countless animals, ...
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Illustration of sleeping person with brain floating above them, holding out shields against pointing shadow fingers. Sleep protects against stress.

Stress-Induced Sleep: A Built-In Snooze Button

Scientists explored how stress can induce sleep in mice and uncovered the brain cells involved in the process. By Vaishnavi Sridhar From an early age, we hear about the importance of adequate sleep; we are told that we must sleep ...
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