Chemistry 

Using Flow Cytometry in Biomedical Science

Flow cytometry is a common laser technique scientists use to look at the characteristics of each single cell in a large population of cells. By Kate Warde How flow cytometry works In flow cytometry, cells are labeled with fluorescent tags that correspond to a specific target; for instance, if we want to look at protein X on a cell, we add a tag that binds to this protein. When the cells run through the cytometer, they are contained in a liquid that flows in single file so that each individual…

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Biology Genetics 

Most of the Human Genome Isn’t Being Actively Studied

There are thousands of genes in the human genome. Why are some genes are studied over and over again, while others are neglected? By Katherine Lindemann Career incentives drive researchers away from understudied genes that could be important to human health. There are around 20,000 human protein-coding genes, but recent studies have suggested scientists actively study only about 2,000 of them. New research investigates why some genes are studied over and over again, while others are neglected. Its authors found that a genes’ medical significance—how likely it is they play a role…

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Science Policy 

Scientists, Please Describe Your Failures

We don’t ask people in other professions to put their failures on display, but it’s vital for speeding up progress in crucial areas of research from climate change to medicine and public health. By Ijad Madisch Ask any budding director if they would like to see the first iterations of Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather. I don’t think many would pass up the opportunity to see Coppola’s process from filming, to editing, to deciding what makes the final cut.  Indeed, people in nearly any occupation, from painters to journalists to architects…

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Failed Experiments Move Science Forward Education Health 

Failed Experiments Move Science Forward

A new series for ResearchGate by Katherine Lindemann Article contributed by Michele Heisler Researchers don’t dream of negative studies, but experiments that don’t go as expected and trials that yield negative results are critical for moving science forward. To highlight this important part of the research process, we asked research scientists to speak about their own experiences with “failure.” Our first contributor is Michele Heisler, a health services researcher who develops and tests health system-based interventions. There is a certain moment that every researcher who develops and evaluates health care interventions…

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European laboratories open to visitors Astronomy Engineering Physics Technology 

Five European Laboratories Open to Visitors

Do you want to see science in action? Now, you can go deep inside some of the top research laboratories in Europe. Our friends at ResearchGate have produced this list of five recommendations for members of the public who want to go where the science happens. The following list includes some of the most amazing laboratories in Europe that are open to visitors. 1. Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire (CERN), France & Switzerland CERN is synonymous with the biggest questions in physics. What is the universe made of? What happened after the Big Bang?…

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