Public Health Fictions: An Interview with Miriam Doyle Health Science Policy 

Public Health Fictions: An Interview with Miriam Doyle

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Miriam Doyle is a public health professional and one of an estimated forty thousand people who participated in the 2017 March for Science in Washington, DC. GotScience: What motivated you to make that sign? Miriam Doyle: Back in 2015, the Center for Medical Progress released manipulative and fraudulent videos about Planned Parenthood. The public uproar over the idea of Planned Parenthood profiting from the illegal sale of “baby parts” had no factual basis, but the impact was still significant. Congress formed the Select Investigative Panel on…

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Science Policy 

Scientists, Please Describe Your Failures

We don’t ask people in other professions to put their failures on display, but it’s vital for speeding up progress in crucial areas of research from climate change to medicine and public health. By Ijad Madisch Ask any budding director if they would like to see the first iterations of Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather. I don’t think many would pass up the opportunity to see Coppola’s process from filming, to editing, to deciding what makes the final cut.  Indeed, people in nearly any occupation, from painters to journalists to architects…

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From California to New Jersey and points in between, friends of GotScience Magazine showed support for science in their I “heart” Science T-shirts from Science Connected. Photos contributed. Citizen Science Science Policy 

Marching On: Science for the People

By Shayna Keyles Twitter @shaynakeyles Instagram @shaynakeyles Tens of thousands descended on state and country capitals on Earth Day to march for science, and I was one of them. I joined up with fellow science lovers in San Francisco, where carbon-based comrades waved permanent-marker protest signs at each other in acknowledgment and wore T-shirts emblazoned with puns or allegiances to research organizations and educational associations. Some even wore lab coats, and one man was spotted wearing a spacesuit and helmet from NASA. People all had their own reasons for marching, but…

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Science Policy 

Photos: March for Science San Francisco

March with Science Connected and GotScience team members joined large crowds of fellow scientists at March for Science events across the United States, from Washington, DC, to San Francisco, CA. Additionally, our friends and allies in the gaming community hosted a virtual event called Gaming for Science in San Bruno, CA. They live-streamed and raised funds for equal-access science education and women in STEM. Enjoy our photo gallery from the San Francisco March for Science. [ngg_images source=”galleries” container_ids=”1″ display_type=”photocrati-nextgen_basic_imagebrowser” ajax_pagination=”0″ order_by=”sortorder” order_direction=”ASC” returns=”included” maximum_entity_count=”500″]

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Citizen Science Science Policy 

Many Ways to March for Science

Cathy Seiler: Why I March for Science The March for Science is this Saturday, April 22. Thousands—perhaps hundreds of thousands—of scientists and supporters of science will take to the streets in Washington, DC, and more than 500 cities in satellite marches around the globe. I will be participating in Bend, Oregon.  Why do I march? I march because science is incredible. How cool is it that scientists are working on curing HIV/AIDS with cord blood transplants? How cool is it that science has increased the length and quality of our…

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Scientists and Social Media Science Policy Technology 

Scientists and Social Media

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Dr. Bill Sullivan is a Showalter Professor of Pharmacology, Toxicology, Microbiology, and Immunology at the Indiana University School of Medicine. That’s an impressive job title, but it’s not his only one. Bill is also a blogger. Social media is an efficient way for research scientists to connect with the public at large. Scientists have tools at their disposal to reach out to millions of people, involve citizen scientists in projects, and collaborate with colleagues. Yet social media use is often stigmatized. Since Bill actively uses social…

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Nuisance Flooding May Cost More Than Extreme Storms Environment Science Policy 

Nuisance Flooding May Cost More Than Extreme Storms

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Climate change affects us in many ways, particularly those of us living near the coasts, who have to bear the brunt of rising sea levels. We usually focus on preparing for that rare superstorm that everyone is talking out. But researchers find that the seemingly harmless episodes of nuisance flooding that we often overlook are becoming more frequent, thanks to rising sea levels, and can turn out to be more costly in the long term. “These diffuse floods happen multiple times a month or year,” says…

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Why Do We Mistrust Science? Science Policy 

Why Do We Mistrust Science?

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg “The values of science and the values of democracy are concordant, in many cases indistinguishable.” —⁠⁠⁠⁠Carl Sagan Many of our public policies depend on how voters and elected officials understand science, but public attitudes toward science, and understanding of scientific research, depend on how people feel about uncertainty. What is uncertainty? To most of us, uncertainty means not knowing. To scientists, however, uncertainty expresses how well something is known. Therein lies the key difference, especially when trying to understand scientific method. “Absence of evidence is not evidence…

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Science Policy Challenges, Part One: A Rising Sea Science Policy 

Science Policy Challenges, Part One: A Rising Sea

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic This is the first in a series of four articles by Dr. Jonathan Trinastic in our new Science Policy section. Why science policy? Five minutes and 27 seconds. That’s the length of time that climate change was discussed across the three presidential debates of 2016, amounting to 2 percent of the total debate time. Although outrage over this scant time has quickly spread, it may be more surprising how little time is spent discussing science as a whole in presidential campaigns. Scientific progress is closely tied…

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Chilean Solar Farm: Cheapest Power Project Ever Environment Science Policy Technology 

Chilean Solar Farm: Cheapest Power Project Ever

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic For a long time, Chilean president Michelle Bachelet has been looking for some sort of magic to ignite her country’s sluggish economy. The spell may finally be cast in the form of solar energy. Chilean Solar Farm Bloomberg reports that a host of electricity supply contracts decreasing the average price for customers by 40 percent have been auctioned off. Among these contracts is one deal with Solarpack Corporación Tecnológica to sell power from a 120-megawatt (MW) solar farm for only $29.10 per megawatt hour (MWh). That…

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