How Do Big Sharks Beat Cancer? Animals Biology Health Oceanography 

How Do Big Sharks Beat Cancer?

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Wouldn’t it be great to have the power to rapidly heal from injuries or to resist cancer? A human with those coveted abilities might be viewed as the stuff of superhero fantasy. However, there are animals on earth that are known for rapid healing and cancer resistance—sharks. Could we possibly learn how sharks do it and copy them? Scientists from Nova Southeastern University (NSU) have unveiled the results of a new genomics study of shark DNA. The study of great white and great hammerhead shark DNA…

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photographing snowflakes Astronomy Book Reviews Environment Oceanography Paleontology 

GotScience Book Reviews for Holiday Season 2016

Spaceman: An Astronaut’s Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe by Mike Massimino One of the best books about human spaceflight that I’ve read in years. Mike doesn’t tell a tale of a superhuman—he comes from humble beginnings, fails multiple times, and through perseverance succeeds in becoming an astronaut. Mike inspires, communicates clearly, and above all teaches that nothing in life is a one-man show. Keep doing what you’re passionate about—it might take you to the stars! Read our full review here.       Secrets of the Seas:…

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Book Review: Secrets of the Seas: A Journey into the Heart of the Oceans Book Reviews Oceanography Photos 

Book Review: Secrets of the Seas

Title: Secrets of the Seas: A Journey into the Heart of the Ocean Reviewed by: Steven Spence for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Author: Callum Roberts Photographer: Alex Mustard Publisher: Bloomsbury Natural History Publication Date: September 22, 2016 Available: Bloomsbury UK; Amazon Rating: 5 out of 5 Secrets of the Seas: A Journey into the Heart of the Oceans is an extraordinary book. Visiting multiple ocean locations, the author and photographer offer glimpses of marine life diversity that few people ever see firsthand. Why I Enjoyed Secrets of the Seas As…

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Old Threats Cause New Harm to Endangered Right Whales Animals Environment Oceanography 

Old Threats Still Endangering Right Whales

By Emily Rhode @riseandsci After decades of recovery from the brink of extinction, the North Atlantic right whale is once again under serious threat from human activity. But this time the decline is not due to overhunting the animals (once prized for being the “right” whales because of their slow speed and tendency to float on the surface when killed). After a long struggle to recover, injury or death from entanglement in fishing gear and a dramatic decrease in whale births have turned this once hopeful success story into a…

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Desert Dust Increases Harmful Marine Bacteria Biology Environment Oceanography 

Desert Dust Increases Harmful Marine Bacteria

By Emily Rhode, @riseandsci A new study out of the University of Georgia could help predict blooms of a common but deadly type of marine bacteria and change the way we view some the planet’s most important environmental processes. The genus Vibrio includes the bacteria that cause cholera. It can also cause gastroenteritis from shellfish consumption and wound infections from seawater in humans, as well as diseases in marine organisms. Dubbed “opportunitrophs,” the bacteria are known for their ability to reproduce and adapt to changes quickly. “Part of what makes these…

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Five Drowned Apostles Oceanography 

Introducing Five New Drowned Apostles

For years, the limestone columns known as the Twelve Apostles have attracted tourists to the southern coast of Australia. These natural formations stand just offshore in Victoria. Suddenly, the Apostles’ numbers have increased. Scientists have discovered five more limestone columns, submerged deep below the waves, and dubbed them the five drowned apostles. The recently discovered sea stacks are about 6 kilometers offshore from Australia’s Great Ocean Road and 50 meters beneath the surface of the water. They were recently revealed during sonar mapping of the seafloor off Victoria’s southern coast. Drowned…

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Animals Biology Oceanography 

Search for the Unicorn—Slightly Off-Center

By Mark Lasbury, MS, MSEd, PhD @ Biologuy1 Zootopia opened in movie theaters on March 4 and is on track to be another Disney classic. Among all the animals featured in this feature, you probably recall a few sporting horns. But did you happen to spot any unicorns? Mythical Unicorns The earliest writings that describe unicorns were those of the Greek writer Ctesias, in the late fifth century BCE. He described the Indian ass, an animal with a white, strong body and perhaps a red head from which sprung a…

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By Brocken Inaglory - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2141765 Animals Oceanography Videos 

So Many Jellyfish, So Little Time

Dr. Joe gets up close and personal with the jellyfish (jellies) at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. “Jellyfish are mesmerizing and beautiful and I have no idea how they work. So I went behind the scenes at the Monterey Bay Aquarium with my new friend Tommy to learn all about them. I saw some things…” Dr. Joe says. Enjoy! Brought to you by It’s OK to be Smart, PBS Digital Studios, and BBC Earth Big Blue Live. Featured photo courtesy of By Brocken Inaglory – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2141765 GotScience.org translates complex…

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A grey whale with scars on its tail flukes, possibly the result of a collision with a marine vessel. Image credit: Ricardo Antunes. Animals Environment Oceanography 

Marine Wildlife Protection Meets Maritime Tracking

When marine mammals surface for air, they are frequently struck by seagoing vessels. In addition, with maritime transport accounting for approximately 90 percent of world trade, the noise made by all those ships may disrupt the navigation of whales and other marine mammals. Besides noise disturbance and fatal strikes, shipping impacts on marine wildlife include introduction of pathogens, fuel spills, and invasive species into the water; habitat destruction through anchoring, especially on coral reefs; and pollution of the air. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), working with researchers and practitioners from public…

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skeleton Animals Biology Oceanography Science & Art 

Preserving a Soft Skeleton: Backs without Bones

By Sebastien Enault What are shark skeletons made of? The skeleton of modern sharks, rays, and skates consists of cartilage, a connective tissue that is lighter and more flexible than bone. Most people closely associate the skeleton with bone, and are familiar with the skeletal structure of many ancient and modern vertebrates, which are beautifully described in a vast number of anatomical works and frequently displayed in most natural history museums. However, while sharks and rays are very popular in aquariums around the world, few people actually know what their…

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